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The News Co/Lab aims to help the public find new ways of understanding and engaging with news and information. We’re based at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

Our Approach

We experiment with new ways to increase public understanding of how news works. Rather than duplicate existing projects, we promote them and seek to expand their efforts. We collaborate with many partners.

Newsrooms

We help newsrooms try new ways of being open about who they are, what they do and why — and to engage with their communities in ways that help people seek, understand, act on and even create news.

Our Funders

We’re grateful for our launch support from the Facebook Journalism Project, News Integrity Initiative, Democracy Fund, and Rita Allen Foundation. Each funder invests in a portfolio of projects worth looking at.

New Initiative

The News Co/Lab received funding from Craig Newmark Philanthropies to improve the reach and effectiveness of journalistic corrections. Discover how we plan to combat misinformation by bringing corrections into the 21st century.

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What We’re Reading

Young Australians prefer to get their news from family, study finds

Young Australians prefer to get their news from family, study finds

While one-third of young Australians feel confident about spotting fake news online, most rarely or never try to find out if online news stories are true or not.
People who share news on social media are more susceptible to misinformation

People who share news on social media are more susceptible to misinformation

People with higher levels of news literacy are less likely to use social media for their news, preferring more trusted sources instead. People who do get their news from social media are much less skeptical of online news, which makes them vulnerable to misinformation.
Swedish students are better at identifying fake images than fake news, a new study finds

Swedish students are better at identifying fake images than fake news, a new study finds

The Uppsala University research noted nine out of 10 teenagers couldn't distinguish a news story from an advertisement.

More of What We’re Reading