Author: Serena O'Sullivan

Readers don’t buy outright lies — but social media users buy a blend of truth and partisan bias the most

Researchers say “fake news” is more defined by partisanship and identity politics than deception and misinformation.

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The different ways journalism and librarianship academia address fake news

A Bradley University professor found librarianship academic articles were less likely to be critical of misinformation on social media than journalism academic articles.

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More engagement leads to more fake news sharing, researchers say

Researchers asked: How can we encourage citizens to be enthusiastic and politically active without spreading misinformation? 

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More people spread made-up news than people who correct it

A new Online Civic Culture Centre study found most British social media users shy away from correcting misinformation — but a large chunk of people have spread misleading news.

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Working with local newsrooms to improve media literacy in their communities

How can increasing transparency and community engagement help journalists boost community media literacy? Managing Director Kristy Roschke will share News Co/Lab findings at NAMLE’s 2019 conference. 

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How emotional reactions influence the way audiences understand news

Findings suggest that a high “need for affect” (NFA), or desire for strong emotions, can mislead readers into thinking they learned more than they actually did.

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Outrageous clickbait content can deter long-term engagement, study finds

Using outrage as a draw reduces credibility and audience trust, according to new research from the University of Texas at Austin.

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News literacy messages can fight social media misinformation

News literacy messages can counteract misinformation and boost positive beliefs of news literacy, but only with multiple messages.

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5 strategies to tell if an image is fake

In a sea of misinformation, it takes a sharp eye to recognize subtle signs of fakery. Luckily, there are ways for you to train yourself to recognize an image that’s been edited to mislead you.

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How news literacy messages can change the way people seek out news media

Can media literacy education mitigate the effect of selective exposure?

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How relevance shapes the public’s news decisions

A new study from The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism finds relevancy is the key factor in how people choose news stories to read.

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UT Austin study suggests process boxes can boost audience trust

Audiences rated news stories with a box explaining their process as more trustworthy than articles without.

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