Category: What We’re Reading

Swedish students are better at identifying fake images than fake news, a new study finds

The Uppsala University research noted nine out of 10 teenagers couldn’t distinguish a news story from an advertisement.

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Moderating uncivil comments takes an emotional toll and lowers trust in news

Uncivil comments taint people’s perception of a news site. They also make moderators more emotionally exhausted and less likely to trust said news outlet, researchers with UT Austin found.

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Young Americans aren’t as confident in their ability to spot fake news as Qatari youths

A new study notes Middle Eastern participants are more confident in identifying misinformation, but there was no significant difference in how people verified information.

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What’s standing in the way of Moroccan media literacy education?

Although many Moroccan secondary school teachers want to teach their students media literacy, educators cite limited training and materials as huge hurdles.

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Readers don’t buy outright lies — but social media users buy a blend of truth and partisan bias the most

Researchers say “fake news” is more defined by partisanship and identity politics than deception and misinformation.

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The different ways journalism and librarianship academia address fake news

A Bradley University professor found librarianship academic articles were less likely to be critical of misinformation on social media than journalism academic articles.

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More engagement leads to more fake news sharing, researchers say

Researchers asked: How can we encourage citizens to be enthusiastic and politically active without spreading misinformation? 

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More people spread made-up news than people who correct it

A new Online Civic Culture Centre study found most British social media users shy away from correcting misinformation — but a large chunk of people have spread misleading news.

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How emotional reactions influence the way audiences understand news

Findings suggest that a high “need for affect” (NFA), or desire for strong emotions, can mislead readers into thinking they learned more than they actually did.

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Outrageous clickbait content can deter long-term engagement, study finds

Using outrage as a draw reduces credibility and audience trust, according to new research from the University of Texas at Austin.

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How community engagement translates to success for local news

New Pew research finds news consumers rate their local news outlets higher if they believe the journalists are connected to the community.

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Media literacy, photography skills — not content — matter most when IDing fake images

UC Davis study finds viewers’ digital literacy skills, social media use and digital imaging experience are “significant predictors of image credibility evaluation.”

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